Technologies Need to Graduate and Move On

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http://allangyorke.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/cropped-IMG_0082.jpg
Mobile learning initiatives seem to be cropping up everywhere.   I read about them online, click hear about them in conference calls, this see presentations when I go to conferences.  They ask questions such as:  How can students access their information on mobile devices?  How can they access the learning management systems?  How can students save money by getting electronic version of their textbooks?

Surely we can think of better questions than these.  Let’s look beyond seeing mobile devices as just another way to access the same materials.  There are unique properties in mobile devices like the iPad that have captured the imagination of developers who have created unique games and social media applications.  These new apps often take advantages of mobile device affordances such as location awareness; touch screens and gesture interface; audio, photo, and video capabilities; instant-on; constant network connection; push notifications; and position awareness (via internal gyroscopes).

So here is a step in the right direction.  Brian Redmond in the Psychology department at Penn State had an opportunity to test a new Psychology ebook from Pearson.  To do the test, we lent him an iPad for a couple of weeks and he wrote a couple of blog posts (post one and post two) about the experience.

In short, the main advantage was the personal feeling that he got from using his hands to page through the materials and interacting with the many self-check activities.  While going through the content areas, you can click on key words or images that flip over to reveal highlighted information such as a definition.  There are also some community aspects that connect students to each other and to the “course mentor”.  The downside was that this ebook is really a web site with mobile-friendly elements.  That sounds great, but it also means that you must be connected to the Internet to access the ebook.  This may actually be a problem for students who have devices with wifi-only access. 

The written description doesn’t quite do it, so when he returned the iPad, I made a quick video to show how the ebook worked. [On a related note, I used my iPhone to make this video. I had a Flip camera, but my iPhone was on hand.]

As I said above, this is a step in the right direction. It doesn’t completely take advantage of the whole iPad interface, but it does more than would be possible with a Kindle version of a book. And part of Brian’s test of the ebook was to get his feedback on the interface, so I hope Pearson pays attention to his feedback and improves their product.
http://allangyorke.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/cropped-IMG_0082.jpg
Mobile learning initiatives seem to be cropping up everywhere.   I read about them online, click hear about them in conference calls, this see presentations when I go to conferences.  They ask questions such as:  How can students access their information on mobile devices?  How can they access the learning management systems?  How can students save money by getting electronic version of their textbooks?

Surely we can think of better questions than these.  Let’s look beyond seeing mobile devices as just another way to access the same materials.  There are unique properties in mobile devices like the iPad that have captured the imagination of developers who have created unique games and social media applications.  These new apps often take advantages of mobile device affordances such as location awareness; touch screens and gesture interface; audio, photo, and video capabilities; instant-on; constant network connection; push notifications; and position awareness (via internal gyroscopes).

So here is a step in the right direction.  Brian Redmond in the Psychology department at Penn State had an opportunity to test a new Psychology ebook from Pearson.  To do the test, we lent him an iPad for a couple of weeks and he wrote a couple of blog posts (post one and post two) about the experience.

In short, the main advantage was the personal feeling that he got from using his hands to page through the materials and interacting with the many self-check activities.  While going through the content areas, you can click on key words or images that flip over to reveal highlighted information such as a definition.  There are also some community aspects that connect students to each other and to the “course mentor”.  The downside was that this ebook is really a web site with mobile-friendly elements.  That sounds great, but it also means that you must be connected to the Internet to access the ebook.  This may actually be a problem for students who have devices with wifi-only access. 

The written description doesn’t quite do it, so when he returned the iPad, I made a quick video to show how the ebook worked. [On a related note, I used my iPhone to make this video. I had a Flip camera, but my iPhone was on hand.]

As I said above, this is a step in the right direction. It doesn’t completely take advantage of the whole iPad interface, but it does more than would be possible with a Kindle version of a book. And part of Brian’s test of the ebook was to get his feedback on the interface, so I hope Pearson pays attention to his feedback and improves their product.
This is a blog. It’s not a work blog. It’s just a place to write, sales solidify some ideas, sanitary and clear my head. So although I say it’s not a work blog, a lot of the stuff here will have to deal with what I think about during work because my career involves the grand Venn diagram between technology, teaching, learning, and research. More broadly, about technology and culture. I’m a nerd at heart, so why wouldn’t I write about technology and culture?

If you like what I have to say, please comment. If you don’t like what I have to say, please comment. If you’re not interested in what I have to say, then I’m sure the Interwebs have more interesting blogs for you to read. If you’re trying to get people to buy prescription drugs via clever comments on this site, please fuck off! This blog is not about erectile dysfunction.

I’m Allan Gyorke. Currently the Assistant Director of Education Technology Services at Penn State.
http://allangyorke.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/cropped-IMG_0082.jpg
Mobile learning initiatives seem to be cropping up everywhere.   I read about them online, click hear about them in conference calls, this see presentations when I go to conferences.  They ask questions such as:  How can students access their information on mobile devices?  How can they access the learning management systems?  How can students save money by getting electronic version of their textbooks?

Surely we can think of better questions than these.  Let’s look beyond seeing mobile devices as just another way to access the same materials.  There are unique properties in mobile devices like the iPad that have captured the imagination of developers who have created unique games and social media applications.  These new apps often take advantages of mobile device affordances such as location awareness; touch screens and gesture interface; audio, photo, and video capabilities; instant-on; constant network connection; push notifications; and position awareness (via internal gyroscopes).

So here is a step in the right direction.  Brian Redmond in the Psychology department at Penn State had an opportunity to test a new Psychology ebook from Pearson.  To do the test, we lent him an iPad for a couple of weeks and he wrote a couple of blog posts (post one and post two) about the experience.

In short, the main advantage was the personal feeling that he got from using his hands to page through the materials and interacting with the many self-check activities.  While going through the content areas, you can click on key words or images that flip over to reveal highlighted information such as a definition.  There are also some community aspects that connect students to each other and to the “course mentor”.  The downside was that this ebook is really a web site with mobile-friendly elements.  That sounds great, but it also means that you must be connected to the Internet to access the ebook.  This may actually be a problem for students who have devices with wifi-only access. 

The written description doesn’t quite do it, so when he returned the iPad, I made a quick video to show how the ebook worked. [On a related note, I used my iPhone to make this video. I had a Flip camera, but my iPhone was on hand.]

As I said above, this is a step in the right direction. It doesn’t completely take advantage of the whole iPad interface, but it does more than would be possible with a Kindle version of a book. And part of Brian’s test of the ebook was to get his feedback on the interface, so I hope Pearson pays attention to his feedback and improves their product.
This is a blog. It’s not a work blog. It’s just a place to write, sales solidify some ideas, sanitary and clear my head. So although I say it’s not a work blog, a lot of the stuff here will have to deal with what I think about during work because my career involves the grand Venn diagram between technology, teaching, learning, and research. More broadly, about technology and culture. I’m a nerd at heart, so why wouldn’t I write about technology and culture?

If you like what I have to say, please comment. If you don’t like what I have to say, please comment. If you’re not interested in what I have to say, then I’m sure the Interwebs have more interesting blogs for you to read. If you’re trying to get people to buy prescription drugs via clever comments on this site, please fuck off! This blog is not about erectile dysfunction.

I’m Allan Gyorke. Currently the Assistant Director of Education Technology Services at Penn State.
Just a quick post.  I ran across a list of iPad apps of children’s books. Seeing some of these really makes me think about the convergence of books, healing videos, emergency and games. Most of the titles on the list defy traditional classification. Maybe we need a new vocabulary – like “story apps”.

Here is a good example:

As a kid, I loved pop-up books and “choose your own adventure” books as well as traditional novels. [I’d add comic books to the list, but I wasn’t really exposed to them until college.]

What I find appealing is the opportunity to interact with a story as it happens. Not necessarily to change the plot, but to at least touch it in some way – literally in this case.
http://allangyorke.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/cropped-IMG_0082.jpg
Mobile learning initiatives seem to be cropping up everywhere.   I read about them online, click hear about them in conference calls, this see presentations when I go to conferences.  They ask questions such as:  How can students access their information on mobile devices?  How can they access the learning management systems?  How can students save money by getting electronic version of their textbooks?

Surely we can think of better questions than these.  Let’s look beyond seeing mobile devices as just another way to access the same materials.  There are unique properties in mobile devices like the iPad that have captured the imagination of developers who have created unique games and social media applications.  These new apps often take advantages of mobile device affordances such as location awareness; touch screens and gesture interface; audio, photo, and video capabilities; instant-on; constant network connection; push notifications; and position awareness (via internal gyroscopes).

So here is a step in the right direction.  Brian Redmond in the Psychology department at Penn State had an opportunity to test a new Psychology ebook from Pearson.  To do the test, we lent him an iPad for a couple of weeks and he wrote a couple of blog posts (post one and post two) about the experience.

In short, the main advantage was the personal feeling that he got from using his hands to page through the materials and interacting with the many self-check activities.  While going through the content areas, you can click on key words or images that flip over to reveal highlighted information such as a definition.  There are also some community aspects that connect students to each other and to the “course mentor”.  The downside was that this ebook is really a web site with mobile-friendly elements.  That sounds great, but it also means that you must be connected to the Internet to access the ebook.  This may actually be a problem for students who have devices with wifi-only access. 

The written description doesn’t quite do it, so when he returned the iPad, I made a quick video to show how the ebook worked. [On a related note, I used my iPhone to make this video. I had a Flip camera, but my iPhone was on hand.]

As I said above, this is a step in the right direction. It doesn’t completely take advantage of the whole iPad interface, but it does more than would be possible with a Kindle version of a book. And part of Brian’s test of the ebook was to get his feedback on the interface, so I hope Pearson pays attention to his feedback and improves their product.
This is a blog. It’s not a work blog. It’s just a place to write, sales solidify some ideas, sanitary and clear my head. So although I say it’s not a work blog, a lot of the stuff here will have to deal with what I think about during work because my career involves the grand Venn diagram between technology, teaching, learning, and research. More broadly, about technology and culture. I’m a nerd at heart, so why wouldn’t I write about technology and culture?

If you like what I have to say, please comment. If you don’t like what I have to say, please comment. If you’re not interested in what I have to say, then I’m sure the Interwebs have more interesting blogs for you to read. If you’re trying to get people to buy prescription drugs via clever comments on this site, please fuck off! This blog is not about erectile dysfunction.

I’m Allan Gyorke. Currently the Assistant Director of Education Technology Services at Penn State.
Just a quick post.  I ran across a list of iPad apps of children’s books. Seeing some of these really makes me think about the convergence of books, healing videos, emergency and games. Most of the titles on the list defy traditional classification. Maybe we need a new vocabulary – like “story apps”.

Here is a good example:

As a kid, I loved pop-up books and “choose your own adventure” books as well as traditional novels. [I’d add comic books to the list, but I wasn’t really exposed to them until college.]

What I find appealing is the opportunity to interact with a story as it happens. Not necessarily to change the plot, but to at least touch it in some way – literally in this case.
In-flight magazines are normally terrible! I don’t blame the writers at all. They have to create stories that are universally un-offensive to just about everyone who might be on a plane. Normally, drug it’s articles about health, visit food, diagnosis destinations, business, and other travel-related topics. I typically glance through the in-flight magazine to pass the time until I hit 10,000 feet and can get out my iPad.

However, on my last trip, I ran across an article that helped solidify some of the ideas that have been bouncing around my head. The article, called “Play” by Mark Anderson in Delta’s Sky Magazine, was largely about the work that Stuart Brown from the National Institute for Play has been doing. The quote that I love from Brown is “The opposite of play is not work … it’s depression”, and he cites animal studies and human cases that indicate that if you’re not permitted to play, you are less resilient to stressful situations.

So some of my ideas about play…

If you watch young animals, they often play as a way to develop skills and muscles – chasing each other, climbing, stalking, pouncing, pretending to be fierce, running away, etc… When I’m around my friends’ kids (ages 4-8), there is a universal game that everyone seems to understand immediately. I act like a monster (not too scary) and start chasing the kids. Before you know it, the kids are all laughing and running around. It’s a lot of fun. It’s play. No one needs to explain the rules. It’s practically instinctive. In all of these cases, this kind of play can be thought of as practice for a potential future situation that may be quite serious (like hunting), but the play allows the skills to develop without danger.

As adults, we can still embrace the idea of play as a form of experimentation: playing with new ideas, playing with models, playing with new technologies, piloting complete systems. We can take some risks, try something, learn from what happens, and try again. Too often, we’re paralyzed by wanting something to be right the first time. It won’t be. Not completely right anyway.

In another blog post, I wrote about the conditions in which epiphanies occur. Essentially, you need to be in a relaxed mental state, at which point a new idea may occur to you and then you instantly recognize that it is the right approach. I think it’s easier to get to that mental state if you have a playful approach to the problems that you’re working on – you take them seriously, but you also don’t cling to any one idea beyond its merit.

There are several other definitions of “play” that I find useful. Playing media (movies, music, podcasts) can be a way to help you think differently – or at a minimum, it can be a way to “whistle while you work”. When I work on events, I like to think of them as plays in the theatrical sense. You have a stage, costumes, props, roles, a story to tell, and audience interaction. And then there is the way elementary school children are graded on areas like “plays well with others” – which translates into volunteering, sharing, cooperating, and teamwork as adults – things that we always look for in new employees. Despite these varying definitions, the one common element is that play is active.

In short, what I’m saying with all of this is that I see play as a key element to the creative process. We need to embrace play – and if that means having a little fun every now and again while we’re working together to solve serious and complex problems, then so be it!
http://allangyorke.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/cropped-IMG_0082.jpg
Mobile learning initiatives seem to be cropping up everywhere.   I read about them online, click hear about them in conference calls, this see presentations when I go to conferences.  They ask questions such as:  How can students access their information on mobile devices?  How can they access the learning management systems?  How can students save money by getting electronic version of their textbooks?

Surely we can think of better questions than these.  Let’s look beyond seeing mobile devices as just another way to access the same materials.  There are unique properties in mobile devices like the iPad that have captured the imagination of developers who have created unique games and social media applications.  These new apps often take advantages of mobile device affordances such as location awareness; touch screens and gesture interface; audio, photo, and video capabilities; instant-on; constant network connection; push notifications; and position awareness (via internal gyroscopes).

So here is a step in the right direction.  Brian Redmond in the Psychology department at Penn State had an opportunity to test a new Psychology ebook from Pearson.  To do the test, we lent him an iPad for a couple of weeks and he wrote a couple of blog posts (post one and post two) about the experience.

In short, the main advantage was the personal feeling that he got from using his hands to page through the materials and interacting with the many self-check activities.  While going through the content areas, you can click on key words or images that flip over to reveal highlighted information such as a definition.  There are also some community aspects that connect students to each other and to the “course mentor”.  The downside was that this ebook is really a web site with mobile-friendly elements.  That sounds great, but it also means that you must be connected to the Internet to access the ebook.  This may actually be a problem for students who have devices with wifi-only access. 

The written description doesn’t quite do it, so when he returned the iPad, I made a quick video to show how the ebook worked. [On a related note, I used my iPhone to make this video. I had a Flip camera, but my iPhone was on hand.]

As I said above, this is a step in the right direction. It doesn’t completely take advantage of the whole iPad interface, but it does more than would be possible with a Kindle version of a book. And part of Brian’s test of the ebook was to get his feedback on the interface, so I hope Pearson pays attention to his feedback and improves their product.
This is a blog. It’s not a work blog. It’s just a place to write, sales solidify some ideas, sanitary and clear my head. So although I say it’s not a work blog, a lot of the stuff here will have to deal with what I think about during work because my career involves the grand Venn diagram between technology, teaching, learning, and research. More broadly, about technology and culture. I’m a nerd at heart, so why wouldn’t I write about technology and culture?

If you like what I have to say, please comment. If you don’t like what I have to say, please comment. If you’re not interested in what I have to say, then I’m sure the Interwebs have more interesting blogs for you to read. If you’re trying to get people to buy prescription drugs via clever comments on this site, please fuck off! This blog is not about erectile dysfunction.

I’m Allan Gyorke. Currently the Assistant Director of Education Technology Services at Penn State.
Just a quick post.  I ran across a list of iPad apps of children’s books. Seeing some of these really makes me think about the convergence of books, healing videos, emergency and games. Most of the titles on the list defy traditional classification. Maybe we need a new vocabulary – like “story apps”.

Here is a good example:

As a kid, I loved pop-up books and “choose your own adventure” books as well as traditional novels. [I’d add comic books to the list, but I wasn’t really exposed to them until college.]

What I find appealing is the opportunity to interact with a story as it happens. Not necessarily to change the plot, but to at least touch it in some way – literally in this case.
In-flight magazines are normally terrible! I don’t blame the writers at all. They have to create stories that are universally un-offensive to just about everyone who might be on a plane. Normally, drug it’s articles about health, visit food, diagnosis destinations, business, and other travel-related topics. I typically glance through the in-flight magazine to pass the time until I hit 10,000 feet and can get out my iPad.

However, on my last trip, I ran across an article that helped solidify some of the ideas that have been bouncing around my head. The article, called “Play” by Mark Anderson in Delta’s Sky Magazine, was largely about the work that Stuart Brown from the National Institute for Play has been doing. The quote that I love from Brown is “The opposite of play is not work … it’s depression”, and he cites animal studies and human cases that indicate that if you’re not permitted to play, you are less resilient to stressful situations.

So some of my ideas about play…

If you watch young animals, they often play as a way to develop skills and muscles – chasing each other, climbing, stalking, pouncing, pretending to be fierce, running away, etc… When I’m around my friends’ kids (ages 4-8), there is a universal game that everyone seems to understand immediately. I act like a monster (not too scary) and start chasing the kids. Before you know it, the kids are all laughing and running around. It’s a lot of fun. It’s play. No one needs to explain the rules. It’s practically instinctive. In all of these cases, this kind of play can be thought of as practice for a potential future situation that may be quite serious (like hunting), but the play allows the skills to develop without danger.

As adults, we can still embrace the idea of play as a form of experimentation: playing with new ideas, playing with models, playing with new technologies, piloting complete systems. We can take some risks, try something, learn from what happens, and try again. Too often, we’re paralyzed by wanting something to be right the first time. It won’t be. Not completely right anyway.

In another blog post, I wrote about the conditions in which epiphanies occur. Essentially, you need to be in a relaxed mental state, at which point a new idea may occur to you and then you instantly recognize that it is the right approach. I think it’s easier to get to that mental state if you have a playful approach to the problems that you’re working on – you take them seriously, but you also don’t cling to any one idea beyond its merit.

There are several other definitions of “play” that I find useful. Playing media (movies, music, podcasts) can be a way to help you think differently – or at a minimum, it can be a way to “whistle while you work”. When I work on events, I like to think of them as plays in the theatrical sense. You have a stage, costumes, props, roles, a story to tell, and audience interaction. And then there is the way elementary school children are graded on areas like “plays well with others” – which translates into volunteering, sharing, cooperating, and teamwork as adults – things that we always look for in new employees. Despite these varying definitions, the one common element is that play is active.

In short, what I’m saying with all of this is that I see play as a key element to the creative process. We need to embrace play – and if that means having a little fun every now and again while we’re working together to solve serious and complex problems, then so be it!
The passing of Steve Jobs today has given me an opportunity to reflect upon his impact on my life. My first experience with computers was with a few Apple II computers in my school. I spent a lot of time playing the educational game President Elect. I learned to program BASIC on an Apple IIe and got good enough to compete in a regional programming competition.

I gravitated toward the new Macs when I went to Penn State as an undergrad. I learned software like Excel, ed Word, illness MacPaint, and MacDraw, and then earned some extra cash teaching those tools to other students through a tutoring center. I bought myself a series of Apple computers and devices (SE/30, Duo, Newton) when I worked at the Hazleton campus and I was introduced to the Web and early videoconferencing (CU-SeeMe).

Aside from a little dabbling with Windows and Linux, I’ve been a loyal Apple user ever since. Not because I worship the Cult of Jobs – I just always found Apple products to work in a hassle-free and often elegant manner. For example, after the Newton was discontinued, I continued exploring the handheld device market (Palm, Windows CE, Blackberry) until the iPhone came along and completed me. My point with all of this is that Steve Jobs, his vision, and the company that he created and then reinvented has had a profound impact on my life.

So I choose to take an opposite stance for those saying “Rest in Peace” to Steve Jobs. My hope is that Steve’s spirit will continue to haunt Apple much as the spirit of Walt has haunted Disney well after his passing. These geniuses are too rare and wonderful to bury and forget.


[Photo from Apple.com]
A few weeks ago, stuff life I was at a meeting with Kevin Morooney (Penn State’s CIO) and Cole Camplese (my boss, implant senior director of Teaching and Learning with Technology). At the meeting, Kevin said that he is increasingly thinking of contracts with vendors in terms of extended pilots instead of permanent arrangements. That idea has been knocking around my head ever since.

I have begun to think of it as the same cycle that a student goes through when they attend Penn State. First, we evaluate their performance to make sure that they can be successful in our environment. We orient them to the university. They start as Freshmen and have a lot of support to ensure that they get off to the right start. They perform well as sophomores and juniors. As they approach their senior year, they prepare to move on – and by moving on, space is prepared for a new student who is being oriented to our environment. Exemplary students may serve two extra years (master’s degree), four extra years (PhD), or more (post-doc). Those that stick around more than four years will be a small number and we should always keep in mind that sooner or later, they are leaving.

This way of thinking has several advantages when applied to educational technologies:

1. Lowering Requirements: We are often faced with a situation where it is difficult to select a direction and move forward because we have several options, none of which are optimal. Any new service would need to meet legal requirements such as protecting student records. But when we think of them as temporary tools that will never have to scale to 100% of university users, then we can select something that looks right for now and go with it. It won’t be perfect. We know that going in. [To mix metaphors a bit, this is also a lot like “serial monogomy” – which is also part of college life.]

2. Constantly Scanning the Horizon: Now that we have selected a new tool, we don’t forget about the selection process. We constantly keep an eye out for the next tool that may come along and improve upon what we have in place. That doesn’t mean jumping to it right away, but we should scout it out so we are prepared to bring in a new class of recruits.

3. Meeting Student Expectations: One nice thing about a new service is that it is more likely to represent more modern interface standards that students have come to expect from the services that they use on a regular basis (currently tools such as Facebook and YouTube). Students want a flow-like experience where the technology is smart enough to anticipate their needs and aware of other helper-services (I do too!). For example, if I paste a link to a video or image, a preview or thumbnail appears without requiring additional action.

4. Meeting Faculty Expectations: We spend a lot of resources on customization requests, largely because faculty, like students, also want tools that match their flow and reflect their pedagogical practices. Instead of investing an increasing amount of effort into propping up 10-year-old tools, we should put that effort into helping faculty tap into a broader array of services, which may be hosted by the university or may be hosted externally, but connected to university systems.

5. Focusing on the Function: Right now, we have ANGEL, MovableType, Adobe Connect, iTunesU, etc… When we start to think of all of these services as temporary, our thinking can shift from the tool to the function that we really and what that tool should do. We need a way to evaluate student progress. We need a mechanism to encourage discussion in the open. We need a way to connect groups of people for synchronous experiences. That way of thinking will lead to much better discussions about course design.

6. Exit Strategy: When we know that something will only be here on a temporary basis, we will go into an agreement already thinking about how we get out of it in a few years and what will come next.

7. Reflecting Reality: The truth is that we are already switching tools every few years. The problems arise when either a) we’re caught off-guard with something that forces a change or b) something has stuck around FAR past its useful lifespan. We need to acknowledge that, “Except for death and paying taxes, everything in life is only for now” (from Avenue Q). Every tool that we currently use will be replaced at some point in the foreseeable future. We need to embrace that reality and plan accordingly.

In closing, here is a rough timeline for those who are still skeptical:

  • 1993 – Broad adoption of the Internet with the spread of user-friendly web browsers. Older technologies such as Gopher and NetNews begin their decline.
  • 1997 – Presence of a variety of Web-based and network-based educational tools at Penn State such as QuizWizard, CourseWeb, FirstClass, and WebCT
  • 2001 – Beginning of the migration of tools into a single system as the university adopts ANGEL
  • 2005-2007 – ANGEL adoption is high, tech-saavy users begin expanding into new social network tools
  • 2010-2011 – Use of wikispaces and blogs systems rapidly increasing, University looks for a system to replace ANGEL

… and some projections into the future:

  • 2015 – ANGEL is gone, new LMS adoption is steady at 50%; rising number of open course experiences; if it isn’t mobile, it’s dead
  • 2019 – LMS use decreased to 25% and only used for key functions (e.g. quizzing); majority of courses hosted on externally-hosted collections of services, tied together through university authentication

Those are my thoughts. I’d be interested in hearing what others think.

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One Response to Technologies Need to Graduate and Move On

  1. Brad K says:

    I really like the idea of staying in the mindset of extended pilots. Like imply above, it is too easy to get paralyzed looking for tools that can meet everyone's requirements, give us the modern features users expect, and be supported at a large university scale. I think part of the equation is cultural. How do we accept, prepare for, and come to expect change.

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